FLCs for 2014-2015

BUILDING UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS TO ENHANCE LEARNING BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

How can faculty and Student Affairs leaders collaborate to provide outside-of-class learning opportunities for students? This FLC will discuss the following topics (based on facilitator prompts, faculty experience, and readings): 1. The identification of current learning partnerships between academic and student affairs (possibly canvassing or surveying campus), 2. The development of effective channels through which campus units can exchange ideas for learning outside the classroom, and 3. The consideration of future initiatives, partnerships, or support programs for the campus.

For more information, contact T.W. Cauthen at twc@uga.edu or Sylvia Hutchinson at smchutch@uga.edu

 

EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT TEACHING BUT WERE AFRAID TO ASK

This FLC is designed for faculty interested in improving their teaching and student learning through discussion with other faculty. Using short readings from the rich well of the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) to prompt discussion, the Teaching FLC will provide a relaxed and informal forum for participants to explore their teaching practice and will encourage participants to consider and implement changes ”large or small" in their teaching with the support and feedback of other participants. Topics could include course design, alternative pedagogies (e.g. team-based learning), innovative teaching and learning activities, active learning, improving assignments and more.

For more information, contact Tom Reichert at reichert@uga.edu or Paul Quick at pauquick@uga.edu

 

GREENLEAVES: ECOCRIT CONVERSATIONS

Ecocriticism is the study of the confluence of nature, literature and culture, and the insights inspired by such study seem more important than ever. The best ecocritcial conversations span academic disciplines in complex ways. This FLC quite simply will function as a forum for ecocritical thinking that we hope will attract the entomologists and the political scientist, the evolutionary biologist and the literary critic, for conversations that range from compost to Whitman's "This Compost," from sustainable agriculture to Wendell Berry's Home Economics, from E. O. Wilson to Barbara Kingsolver, from Frankenstein to factory farming. The conversation will be a relaxed exchange prompted by short ecocritical writings, and the conversation will, by design, be free-ranging.

For more information, contact Claiborne Glover at glover@uga.edu or Ron Balthazor at rlbaltha@uga.edu

 

LEARNING COMMUNITIES ON THE SCHOLARSHIP OF TEACHING AND LEARNING

Two learning communities offered in the 2014-2015 year will focus on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL); one for faculty members, and one for graduate students. SoTL is the systematic study of teaching and learning; it involves asking a question, gathering evidence, drawing conclusions based on that evidence, and making those research findings public for the benefit of others. The members of these communities will decide the direction and goals of the community, but a general plan will be to design a SoTL research project in the fall, and to gather data during spring semester.

For more information on the faculty community, contact Denise Domizi at dpinette@uga.edu. For more information on the graduate student community, contact Denise Domizi at dpinette@uga.edu or Judy Milton at jmilton@uga.edu

 

MINDFULNESS FOR EDUCATIONAL, RESEARCH, AND PERSONAL AND RELATIONAL BENEFIT

We are developing a web site for the University and Athens Community promoting mindfulness and other practices of meditation for the benefit of students, faculty and staff. There is an abundance of research demonstrating the benefits of mindfulness and meditation for psychological benefit as well as educational benefit. There are also increased funding oportunties to develop research proposals incorporating meditation. A number of universities around the country already have resources on their website pertaining to meditation. We want to develop and promote mindfulness practices for the university community. This FLC first came together in 2013 and we have started developing a web site. This group also shares in discussing (and practicing) ways to incorporate meditation in our classes and research, as well as for our own benefit.

For more information contact Jerry Gale at jgale@uga.edu

 

NEXUS CLASSROOM: WHERE TEACHING AND RESEARCH COALESCE

One of the perennial issues in twentieth and twenty-first century American higher education has been the relationship between teaching and research. This FLC will explore the incredible potential that rests at the nexus of teaching and research and how their interaction can enhance student learning and classroom engagement, particularly at the University of Georgia. The FLC's examination of the "nexus classroom" will call on members' experiences in both teaching and research, guest discussants including administrators and students, as well as common readings like The University and its Disciplines: Teaching and Learning Within and Beyond Disciplinary Boundaries (2008)​ and Research and Teaching: Beyond the Divide (2006)

For more information, contact Chase Hagood at tchagood@uga.edu or James (Jeb) Byers at jebyers@uga.edu

 

NON-TENURE TRACK FACULTY

This FLC will offer Non-Tenure Track Faculty (such as lecturers, academic professionals, public service representatives, research professionals, clinical faculty, etc.) a community to discuss issues unique to our roles across the university. Topics of discussion might include teaching awards, guidelines for promotion, utilizing new/existing technology, balancing multiple departmental roles, actively engaging students and other teaching issues, as well as topics of interest to the community. We will learn from each other to improve our teaching and service to the university and provide professional development by peer-reviewing each other's teaching. This FLC may choose to work towards an outcome related to developing a website for resources, Teaching Portfolios, compiling departmental policies, or developing a workshop for new/existing Non-Tenure Track Faculty. This FLC will be capped at 10 participants.

For more information, contact Melissa Kozak at mskozak@uga.edu

 

ONLINE LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE PEDAGOGY

The growing number of classes of foreign languages and literature being taught online call for a renewed pedagogy that reconcile the oral- and interpersonal-driven approach of language pedagogy with the capabilities of networked computers. We believe that this renewed pedagogy should rely on a creative collaboration between established faculty, who benefit from a long experience in teaching foreign languages and literature, and younger faculty and students, who benefit from a know-how and curiosity for the newest capabilities of networked computers. The goal of the monthly meetings of this FLC is to share our experience in online teaching and supervise a workshop series on online language and literature pedagogy open to both faculty and advanced graduate students. In addition to its workshop series, the FLC will share the transcripts of its workshops as well as tutorials on specific online pedagogical tools through its website: http://ugaonlinepedagogy.wordpress.com

For more information, contact Jonathan Baillehache at baille@uga.edu

 

PROVIDING FEEDBACK IN TEACHING

College administrators currently assess good teaching largely through student evaluations and the occasional peer-teaching observation. These two measures often fail to encourage active, outcome-oriented, inquiry-driven curriculum because of their focus on accurate delivery of content and perceived student satisfaction. In addition, these measures are often biased by characteristics like instructor likability or use of undemanding assessments. Because they are not designed to recognize the use of methods that maximize active student learning, these measures serve as a major obstacle to their adoption. Building from literature on the role of feedback in K-12 teacher education and the general workforce, I would like our learning community to try a peer coaching model for providing individualized formative suggestions for improving teaching.

For more information, contact Peggy Brickman at brickman@uga.edu

 

SUSTAINABILITY ACROSS THE CURRICULUM

In order to move towards a healthy, equitable society while maintaining earth's basic systems, we as educators must cross disciplinary divides and infuse sustainability principles into every discipline, teaching our students to approach problems holistically and to integrate social, economic, and environmental concerns as they apply knowledge learned. The Sustainability Across the Curriculum FLC will function as a working group on sustainability in the curriculum.  This year, the FLC will use the UNESCO Sustainability Teaching and Learning resource as a framework (unesco.org/education/tlsf/) for our discussion. Our conversation will range from the theoretical to the practical, from the basics of sustainability to examples of effective sustainability curriculum.  

For more information, contact Ron Balthazor at rlbaltha@uga.edu or Tyra Byers at tyrab@uga.edu